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  • Over 17,000 customers since 2013
  • sales@batsbathrooms.co.uk
  • 020 8870 0066 (option 4)
  • Use code "bathroom" for 5% OFF
  • Free Shipping on orders over £499

A Rough Guide to water Pressure

The tap or shower you choose to buy will partly depend On the amount of water pressure you have in your Property.

Below is a rough guide to how much water pressure You might have?

And this depends on your water system.

We would always recommend that your plumber complete a water pressure test, this would usually be completed early morning as you are likely to use your shower/tap’s at the same time as you neighbours. A water pressure test will give you a definitive reading of the pressure in your property. Pressure is usually measured in bar , you will often see either LP,HP1/2 or 3 besides the description of a tap.

These can be translated like this:

LP (0 – 1 bar of pressure) – Low pressure ( Conventional system with a water storage tanks).

HP1 (1-2 bar of pressure) – Moderate pressure (Combination boiler).

HP2 (2-3 bar of pressure) – High pressure (Pumped system/high flo combination boilers/Unvented/sealed systems).

HP3 (3+ bar of pressure) – High pressure (Pumped system/unvented or sealed system).

A Combination Boiler Is there a boiler, usually located in the kitchen, but no hot water storage cylinder? Combination boilers instantly heat mains fed cold water and so do not require any storage tanks. If you have a combination boiler you will generally have Over 1 bar pressure and can therefore choose any tap or shower on this site that has a minimum operating pressure of 1 bar or below. Unless we specifically state that a combi boiler cannot be used with this item.

An exception to the combi boiler rule is something called a HIGH FLOW (often displayed as High-flo) Combination boilers, Essentially the same internally as a normal boiler (although physically large in size) with the exception of a small unvented cylinder to boost water pressure (anywhere between 50% and 100%) at the side is a diagram of a typical combi boiler lay out.

A Low Pressure System Is there a hot water storage cylinder in the airing cupboard and a cold water tank in the loft? If your system is gravity fed you will typically find a tank in your loft.

If you are running this system without a pump then you will typically have a low pressure system and you should try and buy taps or showers which have the lowest minimum operating pressure.

Normally this would be about 0.2 bar. However the benefit of a low pressure system Is that it is easily and relatively cheaply to upgrade to a high pressure by means of a pump.

A Pumped systems Pumps come into two major categories:

Positive – The pump is gravity feed water (the tanks are above the location of the pump).

and

Negative – These pump can pull water from a source (tank) underneath the pumps physical location and push it to the point of use.

The incoming main has no bearing on the performance of this system. Is there a booster pump fitted, similar to these shown in the picture below, and no cold water tank in the loft?

If your system is a pumped cylinder then you can choose any shower system or tap on this website as you will have High Pressure.

An example of an pumped system lay out Is shown below. And it will have a pump something like this. We hope this helps with your choice of taps and showers.

Unvented cylinders (sometimes called Magaflows)

Is there a hot water cylinder in the airing cupboard,

with an expansion tank on top and no cold water

tank in the loft?

If your system is an unvented cylinder then you

can choose any shower system or tap on this website

as you will have High Pressure.

These are often identified by the brand name

“mega-flow”

**Be warned** owning a unvented system dose

not always guarantee a high pressure system and

is based on the pressure of the incoming water

main (please see notes above about pressure

testing).

We hope this rough guide helps with your choice of taps and showers.